The following three papers authored by Dr. Leshchinsky (et al) reviewed testing of PRS-Neoweb™ earth retention walls at the shake table National Seismic Research Institute in Japan. The tests on a variety of wall types replicated seismic activity similar to a severe earthquake. The study concluded that geocells can be used successfully to form gravity walls as well as reinforcement layers even when subjected to a very high seismic load beyond that of the Kobe earthquake.

The study resulted in recommended seismic reduction factors (0.3-0.4) that are used in the design of gravity and reinforced walls. Dr. Leshchinsky noted, however, that geocells made from HDPE are unsuitable for long-term applications, and guidelines were given to PRS to further the development of its Neoloy based PRS-Neoweb geocell for demanding applications requiring long-term performance.

Research and Innovation: Seismic Performance Geocell Earth-retention Systems, Geosynthetics, Leshchinsky, D. (2009).

Testing of PRS-Neoweb retention walls at the National Seismic Research Institute replicating. The Editors of Geosynthetics Magazine noted that “this article departs from this policy in an effort to offer a guideline, an example, of how product development for the geosynthetics industry can be done effectively. We hope these lessons can further advance the geosynthetics industry into the 21st century with much success.”

Equivalent Seismic Coefficient in Geocell Retention Systems, Geotextiles and Geomembranes Journal, Ling, H.I., Leshchinsky, et al (2009).

Results obtained from a large scale shake tables tests on reinforced geocell slopes are presented, where PRS-Neoweb performed well under seismic loading, with Reduction Factors between 0.3 and 0.4 times PGA. Dr. Leshchinsky noted, however, that geocells made from HDPE are unsuitable for long-term applications.

Seismic Response of Geocell Retaining Walls, Geotechnical & Geoenvironmental Engineering, Ling, H.I., Leshchinsky, et al (2009).

Report on seismic response of PRS-Neoweb earth retention walls at the shake table National Seismic Research Institute in Japan, to seismic activity similar to a severe earthquake, to determine the failure mechanisms and PRS-Neoweb performance.   Deformation was negligible or within acceptable values and the walls remained stable.